Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Future of Work is Now

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Today’s post was shared by the U.S. Labor Department and comes from blog.dol.gov

Many people take advantage of the end of one year and the beginning of the next to reflect on the past and set goals for the future. The Labor Department looked at the future of work in the United States in a similar manner, coming up with challenges and choices regarding the future of work at a three-day symposium earlier this month.

The post specifically mentions “increased exposure to workplace health and safety risks.” As we all enter 2016, I challenge you, whether worker or employer, to think about how you’ll address the workplace risks with which you are faced. Please contact an experienced workers’ compensation lawyer with questions if you are hurt on the job or have concerns about an unsafe work environment.

As a reminder, the offices of TruckerLawyers.com and Rehm, Bennett & Moore will close at 3:30 p.m. Central on Wednesday, Dec. 31, and open again at 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 4.

Have a happy and safe New Year’s celebration, and please consider reflecting on the past year and discussing or setting safety goals for 2016.

Last week, the Department of Labor held a three-day symposium on the future of work in America. We brought together nearly 400 people from academia, the business community, labor unions and other worker advocacy groups, foundations and government to explore the challenges and opportunities resulting from fundamental shifts in employment relationships in our economy. We discussed how labor laws and the department can keep pace, promoting shared prosperity and protecting workers while encouraging innovation.

Here are some diverse perspectives from just a few of the many insightful participants:

A few key themes came up over and over during our discussions at the symposium.

CHALLENGES Major changes in the workforce underway for the last three decades have created challenges for millions of workers in terms of stagnating wages, violations of labor standards, and increased exposure to workplace health and safety risks. These changes also are affecting the way that we have historically provided benefits and skills training. We must craft workplace policies that consider and respond to these changes and that reflect our fundamental values, priorities and principles, which are constant regardless of whether the industry at issue is low tech, high tech or somewhere in between.

CHOICES Economic, technological and social forces are influencing the nature of work. But businesses, workers and the public sector have choices to make in shaping our future. We can embrace cutting-edge business…

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The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore and Trucker Lawyers are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Six attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 90 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska and Iowa in state-specific workers’ compensation systems. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

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The Largest Apprenticeship Investment in U.S. History

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Today’s blog post was shared by the U.S. Department of Labor and comes from blog.dol.gov via Causey Law Firm, located in Seattle. In this recent blog post, Labor Secretary Tom Perez promotes apprenticeships. “Every business I visit that has an apprenticeship program swears by it. They talk about the incredible return on investment: greater worker productivity, higher retention rates, reduced injuries and improved morale they see from their apprentices,” Perez writes. Recent grants will not only expand the number of apprenticeships available but also promote new industries participation, including health care, finance and IT, according to the blog post.

Any effort that trains today’s workers for the jobs of the future seems to be a good investment to me. As a bonus, such results as reduced injuries for those workers who have been apprentices, also obviously lead to safer workplaces. I look forward to learning more about this effort and seeing what develops for apprenticeships in Nebraska and Iowa.

Secretary Perez, right, meets with LeDaya Epps, center, and James Martinez, both apprentices at the Crenshaw/LAX light rail line project office and construction site.
Secretary Perez, right, meets with LeDaya Epps, center, and James Martinez, both apprentices at the Crenshaw/LAX light rail line project office and construction site.

Since Day One, the Obama administration has been focused on building a training and workforce system that serves job seekers and job creators alike. We’re empowering people with the tools to punch their ticket to the middle class, while giving employers a pipeline of skilled workers so they can grow and compete in the 21-century economy.

That’s why we’re doubling down on apprenticeship, a tried and true, earn-while-you-learn model. Every business I visit that has an apprenticeship program swears by it. They talk about the incredible return on investment: greater worker productivity, higher retention rates, reduced injuries and improved morale they see from their apprentices.

And for the themselves, the benefits are undeniable. The average starting salary upon graduation is $50,000. An apprentice will earn an average of $300,000 more in wages and benefits over his or her career than peers who haven’t apprenticed. Apprenticeship offers a smooth pathway to the middle class and to a college degree for those who wish to continue their education and training. I like to call it the other college – without the debt.

President Obama has made it clear that apprenticeships are critical to the strength of our workforce and our economy. Today, at Macomb Community College in Michigan, he announced…

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The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore and Trucker Lawyers are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Six attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 90 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska and Iowa in state-specific workers’ compensation systems. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

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What can we do about shift work?

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Today’s post was shared by Jon L Gelman and comes from strongerunions.org

Working the night shift can be hard on a person from many perspectives, as has been written in this blog before (see Night Shift Work Causally Linked to an Increase in Breast Cancer and Falling Asleep On The Job: Insufficient Sleep Is A Compensable Condition).

The new research that recently came out includes more details with the sleep challenges of night-shift work affecting the body and being linked to breast cancer.

“However it is not just breast cancer that is more likely to be caused by shift working. Shift work has been shown to lead to heart problems, type2 diabetes and obesity. It is also linked to stomach problems and ulcers, depression, and an increased risk of accidents or injury. We have known about these problems for many years and researchers continue to find links between shift work and health concerns.”

Unfortunately, the article doesn’t have many solutions to offer, but it is encouraging that discussion and research is continuing so workers can be as safe and productive as possible, regardless of their shift.

“That means that unions and employers have absolutely no idea what kind of shiftwork patterns we should be agreeing. Are rotating shifts better than permanent nights? If so what are the best type? What steps can employers take to reduce the effects of shiftwork?”

SHIFTWORK

There has been a lot of research published in the past few years around the effect of shift work and our health since the World Health Organisation classified night shift work as a probable carcinogen back in 2007. In 2012 research for the HSE estimated that the additional breast cancer risk associated with night shift working would have translated into about 2,000 extra cases of breast cancer (out of a total of about 43,200 in Britain) in 2004. That would mean around 550 additional deaths and makes it the biggest occupational killer after asbestos. A study in 2013, based on 2,300 women in Vancouver found that women who worked night shifts for 30 years or more were twice as likely to develop breast cancer.

More research was published this week on the link between shift work and cancer. The new one comes from researchers in the Netherlands and Germany and appears to support previous research suggesting a link between night-shift work and breast cancer. Although this research is in mice it is important because it provides the first experimental proof that shift work increases breast cancer development.

However it is not just breast cancer that is more likely to be caused by shift working. Shift work has been shown to lead to heart problems, type2 diabetes and obesity. It is also linked to stomach problems and ulcers, depression, and an increased risk of accidents or injury. We have known about these problems for many years and researchers continue to find links between shift…

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The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore and Trucker Lawyers are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Six attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 90 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska and Iowa in state-specific workers’ compensation systems. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

Federal Regulators Link Workers’ Comp Failures To Income Inequality

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Screen-Shot-2015-08-01-at-2.20.04-PMToday’s post was shared by Gelman on Workplace Injuries and comes from www.npr.org

Here is a short but extremely important and insightful article from National Public Radio that highlights how workers’ compensation shortcomings affect injured workers and their loved ones. The OSHA report itself is a 12-page read, including the executive summary, with around four pages of end notes, putting the document at 20 worthwhile pages total. The bullet-point list from the NPR article is very helpful, and each of the bullet points is very important. However, there are two thoughts that jumped out:

1.“Employers pay only 21 percent of the costs of workplace injuries through workers’ compensation. Families end up bearing 50 percent of the costs and taxpayers pay 16 percent when workers resort to food stamps or Social Security Disability.”

2. “On average, injured workers earn $31,000 or 15 percent less in the 10 years following a workplace injury”

These points are important because they illustrate two of the many costs when workers’ compensation systems don’t live up to their obligations. I will continue to address these costs as discussion is merited in future blogs.

However, if you’re a loved one of an injured worker, you’re well aware of the stark reality: there are very real financial costs, among many other issues, to deal with when a person gets hurt at work. These financial costs are reflected in both treatment of injuries and reduced income after a work injury, as listed above.

If by some chance you don’t personally know anyone who has ever been injured on the job, I suspect that you’re still a taxpayer. As a taxpayer, and hopefully an empathetic human being, we should all be aware of how we subsidize businesses and insurance companies when it comes to workers’ compensation incidents.

Because if the workers’ compensation system worked as it was supposed to, even acting as “an incentive to provide a safe workplace” as mentioned in the article, fewer people would be injured. Though it may be idealistic, then businesses would be more productive, and workers would have safer places to work. Finally, society would have fewer opportunities to subsidize a system that is not always making a good-faith effort when it comes to providing the benefits that an injured worker needs to move on with life.

A few hours after ProPublica and NPR issued the first in a series of reports about workers’ compensation “reforms” sweeping the country, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration coincidentally released a paper linking workplace injuries to income inequality.

The OSHA paper and ProPublica/NPR stories come to similar conclusions about how some injured workers have been affected by a decade of changes in workers’ compensation laws, including cutbacks in benefits and more difficulty in getting benefits.

But OSHA goes on to say that many injured workers and their families find themselves in “a trap which leaves them less able to save for the future or to make the investments in skills and education that provide the opportunity for advancement.”

Among the paper’s other major points:

  • On average, injured workers earn $31,000 or 15 percent less in the 10 years following a workplace injury
  • Employers pay only 21 percent of the costs of workplace injuries through workers’ compensation. Families end up bearing 50 percent of the costs and taxpayers pay 16 percent when workers resort to food stamps or Social Security Disability.
  • With employers not bearing the full costs, which OSHA characterizes as a subsidy, the incentive to provide a safe workplace is undermined.
  • Fewer than 40 percent of eligible injured workers apply for workers’ compensation benefits.
  • In California, 1/3 of workers with reported amputations at work did not receive workers’ compensation benefits. In…

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The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore and Trucker Lawyers are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Six attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 90 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska and Iowa in state-specific workers’ compensation systems. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

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The workers’ compensation system is broken — and it’s driving people into poverty

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Today’s post was shared by Gelman on Workplace Injuries and comes from www.washingtonpost.com

This article from March is a helpful snapshot of what was an eventful week in the fight for workers’ compensation benefits. As is written below: “Fewer people are getting hurt on the job. But those who do are getting less help.”

I found it striking that the U.S. Department of Labor discovered that not only do low-wage workers have high rates of injury, but also “that injuries can slice 15 percent off a person’s earnings over 10 years after the accident.” So, it’s the people who can afford it the least who are suffering the most.

The concern of people who are really employees being misclassified as independent contractors not entitled to benefits, along with a huge rise in temporary workers, is also troubling.

As a reminder, someone has to pay when people are injured through incidents in the workplace, and if it’s not businesses or their insurance companies through the workers’ compensation system, it’s likely to be taxpayers.

“When a worker ends up unable to work because of an injury, he or she can be covered by Social Security Disability Insurance, a program that has steadily increased in cost over the past two decades. The rise has many demographic factors behind it, but it looks like the abdication of responsibility by employers may have played a role as well.”

In addition to reading the excellent article from The Washington Post that is below, here are some links to blog posts that have discussed some of the issues raised in this article: Examining Workers’ Compensation Costs to Employers; The Effects of Not Working; and Workers’ Compensation “Reforms” by State Have Costs, Too.

There’s a good news/bad news situation for occupational injuries in the United States: Fewer people are getting hurt on the job. But those who do are getting less help.

That’s according to a couple of important new reports out Wednesday on how the system for cleaning up workplace accidents is broken — both because of the changing circumstances of the people who are getting injured, and the disintegration of programs that are supposed to pay for them.

The first comes from the Department of Labor, which aims to tie the 3 million workplace injuries reported per year — the number is actually much higher, because many workers fear raising the issue with their employers — into the ongoing national conversation about inequality. In an overview of research on the topic, the agency finds that low-wage workers (especially Latinos) have disproportionately high injury rates, and that injuries can slice 15 percent off a person’s earnings over 10 years after the accident.

“Income inequality is a very active conversation led by the White House,” David Michaels, director of the Occupational Health and Safety Administration, said in an interview. “Injuries are knocking many families out of the middle class, and block many low-wage workers from getting out of poverty. So we think it’s an important component of this conversation.”

There are two main components to the financial implications of a workplace injury. The first is the…

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The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore and Trucker Lawyers are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Six attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 90 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska and Iowa in state-specific workers’ compensation systems. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

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Senator Boxer calls US chemical facility safety “outrageous” and “unacceptable”

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Today’s post was shared by Gelman on Workplace Injuries and comes from scienceblogs.com

This general topic: hazardous chemicals, their storage, and how they can affect the general public, is one that has been discussed on the blog before. It is an important topic, and folks should read the entire article below to learn about the lack of progress in keeping the country’s communities safe from hazardous chemicals, including ammonium nitrate.

The section about OSHA was very useful and included both a gut check and a road map of sorts about how workers could be better protected from the huge number of chemical incidents that have occurred since the West, Texas, explosion in April 2013.

“The cap on OSHA’s fine for a serious violation, Michaels (Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) David Michaels) explained, is $7000; for a willful violation, $70,000.” Michaels went on to explain, “To a small company that’s a significant deterrent. But to large employers, especially petrochemical plants, that’s not even the cost of doing business.” It was noted in the article that Congress hasn’t amended OSHA’s penalties “since 1990 and only once since OSHA was established.”

“We would be very grateful,” said Michaels, “if Congress would allow us to issue penalties at a much greater level.”

I would concur that if OSHA’s broken regulatory system were given more teeth, that many more workers in the United States would be safer in the new year.

Today’s post is shared from scienceblogs.com/

As last week’s Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing made abundantly clear, communities throughout the United States are at ongoing risk from potentially disastrous incidents involving hazardous chemicals. A new Congressional Research Service report released concurrently by Senator Edward J. Markey (D-MA), details how thousands of facilities across the country that store and use hazardous chemicals are located in communities, putting millions of Americans at risk. Yet this list of facilities, Senator Markey’s office points out, may not be complete. The report analyzes US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data on locations where at least one of 140 different extremely hazardous materials are stored. But this EPA list does not include the highly explosive substance ammonium nitrate – the chemical involved in the April 2013 West, Texas fertilizer plant explosion that killed 15 people and injured approximately 200.

What has happened – or more precisely, not happened – since that incident was the focus of the December 11th Senate hearing. The hearing, convened jointly with the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, was held to review progress made in implementing President Obama’s Executive Order 13650 issued in August 2013 in the wake of the West, Texas disaster.

“In the 602 days since the West, Texas tragedy there have been 355 chemical…

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The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore and Trucker Lawyers are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Six attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 90 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska and Iowa in state-specific workers’ compensation systems. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

Administration Warns Employers: Don’t Dump Sick Workers From Plans

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Today’s post was shared by Gelman on Workplace Injuries and comes from www.npr.org

I think the post is timely because it is currently open enrollment at healthcare.gov for 2015. Here’s a link with the details of deadlines and the nuances involved. Generally speaking, open enrollment is now through Feb. 15, 2015.

For those with 2014 coverage through the Affordable Care Act, current coverage ends on Dec. 31 of this year, according to healthcare.gov. Keep this deadline in mind: “If you want a new plan to start January 1, 2015, you must renew or change your plan by December 15, 2014.”

Here’s an incentive for those who are more financially motivated than motivated by having insurance to prepare for the unexpected. “If you don’t have health coverage during 2015, you may have to pay a penalty. The fee in 2015 is higher than it was for 2014 — 2% of your income or $325 per adult/$162.50 per child, whichever is more,” according to the marketplace deadlines page on healthcare.gov.

Also, a person can enroll in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) anytime, according to this website. Qualifications vary by state and depend on income level or disability.

Although Nebraska was not a state that expanded Medicaid in 2013 or 2014, it is likely that the legislature will address the issue again in 2015, according to this recent newspaper article.

If you have questions about whether your employer is discriminating against you, please contact an experienced employment attorney like Jon Rehm.

Man holding pills with banknote money flying away
Man holding pills with banknote money flying away

As employers try to minimize expenses under the health law, the Obama administration has warned them against paying high-cost workers to leave the company medical plan and buy coverage elsewhere.

Such a move would unlawfully discriminate against employees based on their health status, three federal agencies said in a bulletin issued in early November.

Brokers and consultants have been offering to save large employers money by shifting workers with expensive conditions such as hepatitis or hemophilia into insurance marketplace exchanges established by the health law, Kaiser Health News reported in May.

The Affordable Care Act requires exchange plans to accept all applicants at pre-established prices, regardless of existing illness.

Because most large employers are self-insured, moving even one high-cost worker out of the company plan could save a company hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. That’s far more than the $10,000 or so it might give an employee to pay for an exchange plan’s premiums.

"Rather than eliminating coverage for all employees, some employers … have considered paying high-cost claimants relatively large amounts if they will waive coverage under the employer’s plan," Lockton Cos., a large brokerage, said in a recent memo to clients.

The trend concerns consumer advocates because it threatens to erode employer-based coverage and drive up costs and premiums in the marketplace plans, which would absorb…

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The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore and Trucker Lawyers are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Six attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 90 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska and Iowa in state-specific workers’ compensation systems. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

Mapping the lives and deaths of workers: An emerging way to tell the story of occupational health and safety

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Today’s post was shared by Gelman on Workplace Injuries and comes from scienceblogs.com

You can’t get more of a big-picture perspective on a problem than by using a map of the globe. I also think being able to quantify a tragic problem like “occupational death, illness or disaster” makes it more real to more people, in addition to those who experience it, or work with it every day, like employees of the firm do.

The Global Worker Watch project and the Center for Construction Research and Training’s Fatality Map leads to more attention to these tragedies, according to a research analyst at the Center for Construction Research and Training.

“‘(The maps) help bring life to the data instead of just looking at the numbers,’ West told me. ‘The visual aspect and the ability to interact help draw some attention to the problem,'” said Gavin West, the research analyst.

I know the map has motivated me to consider some future blog posts using some of the raw data, and I encourage you to read and explore the information yourself to both honor those who were killed or hurt at work and also obtain information about workplace conditions both close to home and at various spots on the globe.

When Bethany Boggess first debuted her online mapping project, she didn’t expect it to attract so much attention. But within just six months of its launch, people from all over the world are sending in reports and helping her build a dynamic picture of the lives and deaths of workers.

The project is called the Global Worker Watch and it’s quite literally a living map of worker fatalities and catastrophes from around the globe. When you go to the site, you’ll see a world map speckled with blue dots, each representing a reported occupational death, illness or disaster. Here are just a few I randomly clicked on: In March in Pakistan, four workers died and 18 were injured when a gas cylinder exploded at a gas company. Also in March in Gujarat, India, two workers died of silicosis, an occupational disease caused by the inhalation of silica dust. Three workers have died in the mines of Coahuila, Mexico, since January. In February, a worker at an Iron County mine site in Utah died after getting trapped on a conveyer belt. Just a few days ago, a worker in the United Kingdom died after falling from an electricity tower. And in May, police in Cambodia opened fire during a labor protest, killing four people.

“Obviously, I’m only capturing the tip of the iceberg,” said Boggess, a 26-year-old epidemiology student at the University of Texas School of Public Health in Austin. “But if I’m just one person and I can do this in six…

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The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore and Trucker Lawyers are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Six attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 90 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska and Iowa in state-specific workers’ compensation systems. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.