Category Archives: Uncategorized

Daylight Savings: Suggestions to help workers adapt to the time change

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Today’s blog post comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s NIOSH Science Blog, via Jon Gelman of Jon L. Gelman, L.L.C., who is a respected advocate for injured workers in New Jersey.

Daylight saving time has many concerns that come along with the “springing ahead” of the clocks. In addition to the added challenge of being on time to commitments on Sunday and also on time to work on Monday and throughout that week, there are some very real safety concerns that have to do with the time change.

“It can take about one week for the body to adjust the new times for sleeping, eating, and activity (Harrison, 2013). Until they have adjusted, people can have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up at the right time. This can lead to sleep deprivation and reduction in performance, increasing the risk for mistakes including vehicle crashes. Workers can experience somewhat higher risks to both their health and safety after the time changes (Harrison, 2013). A study by Kirchberger and colleagues (2015) reported men and persons with heart disease may be at higher risk for a heart attack during the week after the time changes in the Spring and Fall,” according to the original article from the CDC’s NIOSH Science Blog.

In addition, a source from this blog post that ran last year, argues that adjusting to the time change can actually take people up to three weeks to recover, and night owls are on the longer end of that spectrum. Also, those who sleep fewer hours – seven or less per day – will struggle more with time changes, according to the CDC’s article, which is linked to above.

Finally, as mentioned on social media during the last Trucker Tuesday posts, you never know what the person next to you is doing or how he or she has been sleeping, so truck drivers and people on the road should take extra care to have safety and defensive driving in mind, especially this week.

“Remind workers to be especially vigilant while driving, at work, and at home to protect themselves since others around them may be sleepier and at risk for making an error that can cause a vehicle crash or other accident,” according to the CDC.

Finally, I would urge you to both have fun and take it easy until your body is used to the perception of an increase in the daylight hours, which brings more time to work and do outside things that mean the arrival of spring! Take care.

DaylightSavingsTimeWeb

Spring forward Fall back.

We all know the saying to help us remember to adjust our clocks for the daylight savings time changes (this Sunday in case you are wondering). But, what can we do to help workers adjust to the effects of the time change? A few studies have examined these issues but many questions remain on this topic including the best strategies to cope with the time changes.

By moving the clocks ahead one hour in the Spring, we lose one hour which shifts work times and other scheduled events one hour earlier. This pushes most people to have a one hour earlier bedtime and wake up time. In the Fall, time moves back one hour. We gain one hour which shifts work times and other scheduled events one hour later thereby pushing most people to have a one hour later bedtime and wake up time.

It can take about one week for the body to adjust the new times for sleeping, eating, and activity (Harrision, 2013). Until they have adjusted, people can have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up at the right time. This can lead to sleep deprivation and reduction in performance, increasing the risk for mistakes including vehicle crashes. Workers can experience somewhat higher risks to both their health and safety after the time changes (Harrison, 2013). A study by Kirchberger and colleagues (2015) reported men and persons with heart disease may be at higher risk for a heart attack during the week after the time changes in the Spring and Fall.

The reason for these…

[Click here to see the rest of this post]

The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore, which also sponsors the Trucker Lawyers website, are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Five attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 95 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska, Iowa and other states with Nebraska and Iowa jurisdiction. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

Daylight Savings: Suggestions to help workers adapt to the time change

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Today’s blog post comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s NIOSH Science Blog, via Jon Gelman of Jon L. Gelman, L.L.C., who is a respected advocate for injured workers in New Jersey.

Daylight saving time has many concerns that come along with the “springing ahead” of the clocks. In addition to the added challenge of being on time to commitments on Sunday and also on time to work on Monday and throughout that week, there are some very real safety concerns that have to do with the time change.

“It can take about one week for the body to adjust the new times for sleeping, eating, and activity (Harrison, 2013). Until they have adjusted, people can have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up at the right time. This can lead to sleep deprivation and reduction in performance, increasing the risk for mistakes including vehicle crashes. Workers can experience somewhat higher risks to both their health and safety after the time changes (Harrison, 2013). A study by Kirchberger and colleagues (2015) reported men and persons with heart disease may be at higher risk for a heart attack during the week after the time changes in the Spring and Fall,” according to the original article from the CDC’s NIOSH Science Blog.

In addition, a source from this blog post that ran last year, argues that adjusting to the time change can actually take people up to three weeks to recover, and night owls are on the longer end of that spectrum. Also, those who sleep fewer hours – seven or less per day – will struggle more with time changes, according to the CDC’s article, which is linked to above.

Finally, as mentioned on social media during the last Trucker Tuesday posts, you never know what the person next to you is doing or how he or she has been sleeping, so truck drivers and people on the road should take extra care to have safety and defensive driving in mind, especially this week.

“Remind workers to be especially vigilant while driving, at work, and at home to protect themselves since others around them may be sleepier and at risk for making an error that can cause a vehicle crash or other accident,” according to the CDC.

Finally, I would urge you to both have fun and take it easy until your body is used to the perception of an increase in the daylight hours, which brings more time to work and do outside things that mean the arrival of spring! Take care.

DaylightSavingsTimeWeb

Spring forward Fall back.

We all know the saying to help us remember to adjust our clocks for the daylight savings time changes (this Sunday in case you are wondering). But, what can we do to help workers adjust to the effects of the time change? A few studies have examined these issues but many questions remain on this topic including the best strategies to cope with the time changes.

By moving the clocks ahead one hour in the Spring, we lose one hour which shifts work times and other scheduled events one hour earlier. This pushes most people to have a one hour earlier bedtime and wake up time. In the Fall, time moves back one hour. We gain one hour which shifts work times and other scheduled events one hour later thereby pushing most people to have a one hour later bedtime and wake up time.

It can take about one week for the body to adjust the new times for sleeping, eating, and activity (Harrision, 2013). Until they have adjusted, people can have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up at the right time. This can lead to sleep deprivation and reduction in performance, increasing the risk for mistakes including vehicle crashes. Workers can experience somewhat higher risks to both their health and safety after the time changes (Harrison, 2013). A study by Kirchberger and colleagues (2015) reported men and persons with heart disease may be at higher risk for a heart attack during the week after the time changes in the Spring and Fall.

The reason for these…

[Click here to see the rest of this post]

The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore, which also sponsors the Trucker Lawyers website, are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Five attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 95 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska, Iowa and other states with Nebraska and Iowa jurisdiction. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

Daylight Savings: Suggestions to help workers adapt to the time change

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Today’s blog post comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s NIOSH Science Blog, via Jon Gelman of Jon L. Gelman, L.L.C., who is a respected advocate for injured workers in New Jersey.

Daylight saving time has many concerns that come along with the “springing ahead” of the clocks. In addition to the added challenge of being on time to commitments on Sunday and also on time to work on Monday and throughout that week, there are some very real safety concerns that have to do with the time change.

“It can take about one week for the body to adjust the new times for sleeping, eating, and activity (Harrison, 2013). Until they have adjusted, people can have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up at the right time. This can lead to sleep deprivation and reduction in performance, increasing the risk for mistakes including vehicle crashes. Workers can experience somewhat higher risks to both their health and safety after the time changes (Harrison, 2013). A study by Kirchberger and colleagues (2015) reported men and persons with heart disease may be at higher risk for a heart attack during the week after the time changes in the Spring and Fall,” according to the original article from the CDC’s NIOSH Science Blog.

In addition, a source from this blog post that ran last year, argues that adjusting to the time change can actually take people up to three weeks to recover, and night owls are on the longer end of that spectrum. Also, those who sleep fewer hours – seven or less per day – will struggle more with time changes, according to the CDC’s article, which is linked to above.

Finally, as mentioned on social media during the last Trucker Tuesday posts, you never know what the person next to you is doing or how he or she has been sleeping, so truck drivers and people on the road should take extra care to have safety and defensive driving in mind, especially this week.

“Remind workers to be especially vigilant while driving, at work, and at home to protect themselves since others around them may be sleepier and at risk for making an error that can cause a vehicle crash or other accident,” according to the CDC.

Finally, I would urge you to both have fun and take it easy until your body is used to the perception of an increase in the daylight hours, which brings more time to work and do outside things that mean the arrival of spring! Take care.

DaylightSavingsTimeWeb

Spring forward Fall back.

We all know the saying to help us remember to adjust our clocks for the daylight savings time changes (this Sunday in case you are wondering). But, what can we do to help workers adjust to the effects of the time change? A few studies have examined these issues but many questions remain on this topic including the best strategies to cope with the time changes.

By moving the clocks ahead one hour in the Spring, we lose one hour which shifts work times and other scheduled events one hour earlier. This pushes most people to have a one hour earlier bedtime and wake up time. In the Fall, time moves back one hour. We gain one hour which shifts work times and other scheduled events one hour later thereby pushing most people to have a one hour later bedtime and wake up time.

It can take about one week for the body to adjust the new times for sleeping, eating, and activity (Harrision, 2013). Until they have adjusted, people can have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up at the right time. This can lead to sleep deprivation and reduction in performance, increasing the risk for mistakes including vehicle crashes. Workers can experience somewhat higher risks to both their health and safety after the time changes (Harrison, 2013). A study by Kirchberger and colleagues (2015) reported men and persons with heart disease may be at higher risk for a heart attack during the week after the time changes in the Spring and Fall.

The reason for these…

[Click here to see the rest of this post]

The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore, which also sponsors the Trucker Lawyers website, are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Five attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 95 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska, Iowa and other states with Nebraska and Iowa jurisdiction. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

Daylight Saving: Suggestions to help workers adapt to the time change

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Today’s blog post comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s NIOSH Science Blog, via Jon Gelman of Jon L. Gelman, L.L.C., who is a respected advocate for injured workers in New Jersey.

Daylight saving time has many concerns that come along with the “springing ahead” of the clocks. In addition to the added challenge of being on time to commitments on Sunday and also on time to work on Monday and throughout that week, there are some very real safety concerns that have to do with the time change.

“It can take about one week for the body to adjust the new times for sleeping, eating, and activity (Harrison, 2013). Until they have adjusted, people can have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up at the right time. This can lead to sleep deprivation and reduction in performance, increasing the risk for mistakes including vehicle crashes. Workers can experience somewhat higher risks to both their health and safety after the time changes (Harrison, 2013). A study by Kirchberger and colleagues (2015) reported men and persons with heart disease may be at higher risk for a heart attack during the week after the time changes in the Spring and Fall,” according to the original article from the CDC’s NIOSH Science Blog.

In addition, a source from this blog post that ran last year, argues that adjusting to the time change can actually take people up to three weeks to recover, and night owls are on the longer end of that spectrum. Also, those who sleep fewer hours – seven or less per day – will struggle more with time changes, according to the CDC’s article, which is linked to above.

Finally, as mentioned on social media during the last Trucker Tuesday posts, you never know what the person next to you is doing or how he or she has been sleeping, so truck drivers and people on the road should take extra care to have safety and defensive driving in mind, especially this week.

“Remind workers to be especially vigilant while driving, at work, and at home to protect themselves since others around them may be sleepier and at risk for making an error that can cause a vehicle crash or other accident,” according to the CDC.

Finally, I would urge you to both have fun and take it easy until your body is used to the perception of an increase in the daylight hours, which brings more time to work and do outside things that mean the arrival of spring! Take care.

DaylightSavingsTimeWeb

Spring forward Fall back.

We all know the saying to help us remember to adjust our clocks for the daylight savings time changes (this Sunday in case you are wondering). But, what can we do to help workers adjust to the effects of the time change? A few studies have examined these issues but many questions remain on this topic including the best strategies to cope with the time changes.

By moving the clocks ahead one hour in the Spring, we lose one hour which shifts work times and other scheduled events one hour earlier. This pushes most people to have a one hour earlier bedtime and wake up time. In the Fall, time moves back one hour. We gain one hour which shifts work times and other scheduled events one hour later thereby pushing most people to have a one hour later bedtime and wake up time.

It can take about one week for the body to adjust the new times for sleeping, eating, and activity (Harrision, 2013). Until they have adjusted, people can have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and waking up at the right time. This can lead to sleep deprivation and reduction in performance, increasing the risk for mistakes including vehicle crashes. Workers can experience somewhat higher risks to both their health and safety after the time changes (Harrison, 2013). A study by Kirchberger and colleagues (2015) reported men and persons with heart disease may be at higher risk for a heart attack during the week after the time changes in the Spring and Fall.

The reason for these…

[Click here to see the rest of this post]

The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore, which also sponsors the Trucker Lawyers website, are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Five attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 95 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska, Iowa and other states with Nebraska and Iowa jurisdiction. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

Summer Jobs and Beyond

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Today’s post was shared by US Dept. of Labor and comes from blog.dol.gov

It’s definitely time for high school and college students to be searching for summer jobs or internship experiences (ideally that are paid).

As Labor Secretary Tom Perez writes, “the skills I picked up in those early jobs – like responsibility, teamwork and problem solving – are skills I use every day.”

It is unfortunate that a summer of work can no longer pay for a semester of college, but it is important to make sure your loved ones who are searching for either their summer gig or first job are aware of concerns like workplace safety.

I encourage you to review this blog post by partner Jon Rehm, Six Tips for Safe and Fair Holiday Employment. Pretty much everything should be covered the same for temporary summer workers, with a few exceptions. That way, your younger loved ones who are prospective workers will know that they should expect and ask for safety training at work and also that they must be notified if they are not covered by workers’ compensation during the summer.

It’s difficult to consider high school and college students potentially getting hurt at work. But the reality is that all workers need to be prepared for that possibility.

However, hopefully the skills gained for summer workers will lead to a lifetime of productive work experiences.

Youth unemployment rates: overall, 11.2%; African-Americans, 19.2%; Latinos, 12.4%. Too many young people are sitting on the sidelines.

As a teenager, I had three paper routes and I worked at a driving range. Being the secretary of labor doesn’t often involve delivering newspapers or picking up golf balls, but the skills I picked up in those early jobs – like responsibility, teamwork and problem solving – are skills I use every day.

For a lot of teenagers, a summer job offers a pathway into the workforce, and we know that having a summer job can make all the difference to someone who didn’t get the easiest start in life. There’s plenty of research showing that meaningful employment opportunities can improve job prospects and help keep kids out of the criminal justice system.

Summer jobs can have huge benefits for both at-risk youths and communities across the country: stronger job prospects; less violent, risky behavior; reduced alcohol/drug use; crime reduction

Summer and after-school jobs help young people develop what some people call “soft skills,” though I think that term is misleading. There’s nothing “soft” about leadership, teamwork, punctuality or problem-solving. Those skills are essential, and learning them early can help put young people on a path to their next move, whether it’s a job or more education.

Unfortunately, summer jobs aren’t always easy to come by for young people – especially for those who live in urban areas.

That’s why I am excited about the $20 million we announced today for the Summer Jobs and Beyond: Career Pathways for Youth competition. The Labor Department will award up to $2 million each to 10 local workforce development boards to expand existing summer jobs programs into…

[Click here to see the rest of this post]

The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore, which also sponsors the Trucker Lawyers website, are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Five attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 95 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska, Iowa and other states with Nebraska and Iowa jurisdiction. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

Tyson Foods’ Injury Incidents Examined Through OSHA Reports

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22-Hispanic-Poultry-Processor-on-LineAs I wrote in a previous blog post, OSHA has decided to make a 90-day regional emphasis on “high-hazard manufacturing industries” in Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri, which are three of the four states in what the Occupational Safety and Health Administrations calls Region 7.*

“The emphasis program focuses on manufacturing industries where injury and illness rates exceed the average for the private sector. Included are manufacturers of the following products: food, furniture, fabricated metal, nonmetallic mineral, machinery, and computer products as well as printing and related support activities,” according to the OSHA news release.

Sadly, this increased inspection effort may have been inspired by some injury incidents recently written about by in an article from the ScienceBlogs website “The Pump Handle: A Water Cooler for the Public Health Crowd” titled “Amputations about at Tyson Foods, OSHA records shed more light on industrial food production.”

Writer Celeste Monforton, who has master’s and doctorate degrees in public health, made a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request regarding the federal OSHA regulation that “requires employers to report within 24 hours any work-related incident that results in an amputation or hospitalization,” according to her article. The request asked for data from Tyson Foods, which “has more than 400 facilities in 30 U.S. states, and it processes 35 million chickens, 400,000 hogs, and 128,000 cattle per week.”#

In a nine-month period, from Jan. 1 through Sept. 30, 2015, Monforton discovered 34 reports by Tyson of amputations or hospitalizations.

“The hospitalizations included a worker at the company’s facility in Rogers, AR (Arkansas) who fell 32 feet off of a roof, and a worker in Holcomb, KS (Kansas) who broke his leg while learning to operate a forklift.”

She goes on to write that 17 of 34 incidents were amputations – in a 9-month period – not even over a whole year. The article has a tragic and sobering table that summarizes the amputations, and it is worth clicking to the article to take a look at the table because it includes the month, body part, equipment or tool in use, product (type of plant), city and state involved in each incident.

Here’s a summary of her list that focuses specifically on Nebraska, Missouri and Kansas, where eight of the 17 amputations occurred.

There were four amputations in the Nebraska plants of Lexington (fingertip; and tips of middle and index fingers using band saws in the beef plant), Omaha (ring, index and pinky fingers using the skinner in the poultry plant) and Dakota City (thumb using the sprocket in the pork plant). There were three amputations in the Missouri plants of St. Joseph (both hands using the auger), Monnet (distal portion third finger using the impeller in the poultry plant), and Sedalia (middle finger to first knuckle on the cone line in the poultry plant). The Kansas amputation was in the Emporia beef plant, when the skinner was being used and the end and outside part of a thumb were amputated.

These incidents (and the Kansas forklift-training one mentioned above) may explain OSHA’s new regional emphasis, as Tyson’s meatpacking plants should definitely count as “high-hazard manufacturing industries,” in my opinion.

Though the reports are brutal and tragic, I hope that Monforton completes more FOIA requests to OSHA to track trends, because each of these injury incidents greatly affected someone and their loved ones, whether their lives were changed temporarily or permanently, such as the worker whose hands were amputated in Missouri.

Meanwhile, though I realize it doesn’t cover the same dates as Monforton’s article, Tyson recently released earnings of “record results” for the first quarter of fiscal year 2016, which ended on Jan. 2 of this year, according to the link above.

“‘Fiscal 2016 is off to a very strong start in what we expect to be another record year,’ said Donnie Smith, president and chief executive officer of Tyson Foods. ‘Solid execution across the entire team resulted in record earnings, record operating income, record margins and record cash flows. We captured $121 million in total synergies for the quarter, with $61 million incremental to fiscal first quarter 2015.

“‘Our on-going efforts to invest in and grow our Core 9 product lines are paying off as sales volume for the most recent four week period was up 4%. The Core 9 product lines represent our strongest brands, greatest pricing power and best category growth opportunities and are major contributors to volume and profitability in the retail channel,’ Smith said. The Core 9 is composed of nine retail product lines in the Tyson®, Jimmy Dean®, Hillshire Farm®, Ball Park®, State Fair® and Aidells® brands.”

Though unfortunately, the number of work-related injury incidents isn’t available for the first quarter above, it’s suspected that they’re not much different than any other three-month snapshot of all the Tyson plants. It is a certainty that you can draw your own conclusions about how Tyson values its workers, based on Monforton’s article. It’s worth noting that in a quarter where record profits were had for shareholders, it’s highly doubtful that it was an amputation-free quarter for all workers, based on past performance in Monforton’s article.

In conclusion, I wish the best for OSHA in its quest to focus on “high-hazard manufacturing industries.”

Here’s hoping that the resulting education efforts and inspections mean greater safety knowledge for workers and fewer life-changing incidents, like amputations, that adversely affect workers, their loved ones, and society as a whole.

*Note that Iowa is also in Region 7, but according to OSHA’s website, it’s one of the states that “operate their own OSHA-approved job safety and health programs and cover state and local government workers.” Because Iowa has a state program, I believe that’s why it’s not targeted in this regional emphasis.

#Note that Monforton’s FOIA “does not include information from the states that run their own OSHA program, 10 of which have Tyson operations,” according to the article she wrote that is linked to above.

The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore, which also sponsors the Trucker Lawyers website, are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Five attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 95 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska, Iowa and other states with Nebraska and Iowa jurisdiction. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Preventing Injury, Uncategorized, Workers' Compensation, workplace accidents, Workplace Injury, Workplace Safety and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

The Future of Work is Now

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Today’s post was shared by the U.S. Labor Department and comes from blog.dol.gov

Many people take advantage of the end of one year and the beginning of the next to reflect on the past and set goals for the future. The Labor Department looked at the future of work in the United States in a similar manner, coming up with challenges and choices regarding the future of work at a three-day symposium earlier this month.

The post specifically mentions “increased exposure to workplace health and safety risks.” As we all enter 2016, I challenge you, whether worker or employer, to think about how you’ll address the workplace risks with which you are faced. Please contact an experienced workers’ compensation lawyer with questions if you are hurt on the job or have concerns about an unsafe work environment.

As a reminder, the offices of TruckerLawyers.com and Rehm, Bennett & Moore will close at 3:30 p.m. Central on Wednesday, Dec. 31, and open again at 8:30 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 4.

Have a happy and safe New Year’s celebration, and please consider reflecting on the past year and discussing or setting safety goals for 2016.

Last week, the Department of Labor held a three-day symposium on the future of work in America. We brought together nearly 400 people from academia, the business community, labor unions and other worker advocacy groups, foundations and government to explore the challenges and opportunities resulting from fundamental shifts in employment relationships in our economy. We discussed how labor laws and the department can keep pace, promoting shared prosperity and protecting workers while encouraging innovation.

Here are some diverse perspectives from just a few of the many insightful participants:

A few key themes came up over and over during our discussions at the symposium.

CHALLENGES Major changes in the workforce underway for the last three decades have created challenges for millions of workers in terms of stagnating wages, violations of labor standards, and increased exposure to workplace health and safety risks. These changes also are affecting the way that we have historically provided benefits and skills training. We must craft workplace policies that consider and respond to these changes and that reflect our fundamental values, priorities and principles, which are constant regardless of whether the industry at issue is low tech, high tech or somewhere in between.

CHOICES Economic, technological and social forces are influencing the nature of work. But businesses, workers and the public sector have choices to make in shaping our future. We can embrace cutting-edge business…

[Click here to see the rest of this post]

The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore, which also sponsors the Trucker Lawyers website, are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Five attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 95 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska, Iowa and other states with Nebraska and Iowa jurisdiction. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

The Largest Apprenticeship Investment in U.S. History

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Today’s blog post was shared by the U.S. Department of Labor and comes from blog.dol.gov via Causey Law Firm, located in Seattle. In this recent blog post, Labor Secretary Tom Perez promotes apprenticeships. “Every business I visit that has an apprenticeship program swears by it. They talk about the incredible return on investment: greater worker productivity, higher retention rates, reduced injuries and improved morale they see from their apprentices,” Perez writes. Recent grants will not only expand the number of apprenticeships available but also promote new industries participation, including health care, finance and IT, according to the blog post.

Any effort that trains today’s workers for the jobs of the future seems to be a good investment to me. As a bonus, such results as reduced injuries for those workers who have been apprentices, also obviously lead to safer workplaces. I look forward to learning more about this effort and seeing what develops for apprenticeships in Nebraska and Iowa.

Secretary Perez, right, meets with LeDaya Epps, center, and James Martinez, both apprentices at the Crenshaw/LAX light rail line project office and construction site.
Secretary Perez, right, meets with LeDaya Epps, center, and James Martinez, both apprentices at the Crenshaw/LAX light rail line project office and construction site.

Since Day One, the Obama administration has been focused on building a training and workforce system that serves job seekers and job creators alike. We’re empowering people with the tools to punch their ticket to the middle class, while giving employers a pipeline of skilled workers so they can grow and compete in the 21-century economy.

That’s why we’re doubling down on apprenticeship, a tried and true, earn-while-you-learn model. Every business I visit that has an apprenticeship program swears by it. They talk about the incredible return on investment: greater worker productivity, higher retention rates, reduced injuries and improved morale they see from their apprentices.

And for the themselves, the benefits are undeniable. The average starting salary upon graduation is $50,000. An apprentice will earn an average of $300,000 more in wages and benefits over his or her career than peers who haven’t apprenticed. Apprenticeship offers a smooth pathway to the middle class and to a college degree for those who wish to continue their education and training. I like to call it the other college – without the debt.

President Obama has made it clear that apprenticeships are critical to the strength of our workforce and our economy. Today, at Macomb Community College in Michigan, he announced…

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The offices of Rehm, Bennett & Moore, which also sponsors the Trucker Lawyers website, are located in Lincoln and Omaha, Nebraska. Five attorneys represent plaintiffs in workers’ compensation, personal injury, employment and Social Security disability claims. The firm’s lawyers have combined experience of more than 95 years of practice representing injured workers and truck drivers in Nebraska, Iowa and other states with Nebraska and Iowa jurisdiction. The lawyers regularly represent hurt truck drivers and often sue Crete Carrier Corporation, K&B Trucking, Werner Enterprises, UPS, and FedEx. Lawyers in the firm hold licenses in Nebraska and Iowa and are active in groups such as the College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers, Workers' Injury Law & Advocacy Group (WILG), American Association for Justice (AAJ), the Nebraska Association of Trial Attorneys (NATA), and the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA). We have the knowledge, experience and toughness to win rightful compensation for people who have been injured or mistreated.

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